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Issues – Unable to Create or Edit a Content Source Schedule?

Posted by Anthony Odole on December 8, 2008

 

 

If after you install SharePoint 2007 you are unable to edit or create content source schedule, your WSS_WPG group does not have correct permissions to the %windir%\Tasks folder on the server designated for indexing service on your MOSS farm. This is the directory where Windows Scheduler stores scheduled tasks.

Following the steps below will resolve this issue:

1.    Use an account that has administrative permissions to log on to the computer that is running the Office SharePoint Server 2007 indexing service.

2.    Click Start, click Run, type cmd, and then click OK.

3.    Type the following command at the prompt, then press Enter attrib –s %windir%\tasks Note: %windir% is the path of the Windows folder.

4.     In Windows Explorer, right-click the Tasks folder, and then click Properties.

5.    In the Tasks Properties dialog box, click the Security tab, and then click Add

6.    In the Select Users, Computers, or Groups dialog box, type WSS_WPG in the Enter object names to select box, and then click OK.

7.    Grant the following permissions for the WSS_WPG account, and then click OK:

  • Read
  • Write

8.    Reset IIS by typing IISRESET at the command prompt.

9.    Type attrib +s %windir%\tasks at the command prompt

 

Following the steps above will eliminate the Access Denied error message, and you should be able to edit or create a content source schedule. We had this issue on one of our MOSS implementations. Although the first thought is that something complex is not working properly with our installation, but the solution is as simple as following the steps above

 

** About the Author: Anthony Odole is a Senior Solution Architect with IBM Global Services. He is a SharePoint Subject Matter Expert. You can reach him at Odolea@gmail.com

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Understanding SharePoint Calender

Posted by Anthony Odole on October 4, 2008

A Calendar is a list with specific dates and times associated with those dates. Since SharePoint is a list-based development platform, SharePoint calendar is no exception. Within SharePoint, you can quickly create a calendar to manage resources like conference room, team vacation schedule, conference, and even holidays. With the other calendars deployed in your SharePoint site, adding a resource managing calendar may become one too many. But because SharePoint is based on list, you can easily combine multiple calendars into one single view. To do this, you need to query the other calendars – remember they are lists too – and then combine the result into a single list that you can then display as a calendar. Of course, to do this, you need to know how to query multiple lists for information. To do this, you need to know how to query multiple list for information; how to combine the result of your query into a single list than you can then display as a calendar. In the near future, I will write a short article on how to do this

On a recent project, we had a requirement to develop a calendar that will …

  • allow a user to schedule a conference room

  • See which of the four available conference room was available

  • What time the rooms were reserved for.

To further make this self managed, the client need us to provide one or two people on the project access to an interface that will allow them to add or remove rooms from the list of rooms assigned to the project. The first thing a user will like to know for a particular day is to check if a resource is available for use. So, to make this very easy, you must display the name of the resource and the name of the team member who reserved the resource – and of course, you also need to display it on the calendar to show not only the date, but the time. Ok, having said that, let’s see how to address this requirement without writing any code.

 

  1. You need to store the resources in a list. Create a list and have two columns added to the list – ID and Resource Name. Then create a content type called Schedule Room. You can call it Schedule Phone Line if you are dealing with phone lines for conference calls

     

  2. Now that you have created the Schedule Room content type, you need to add a column.This column should have a lookup that will pull all the available resources stored in the list defined in step 1 above.

     

  3. So, when you click on new, you should see “Schedule a Room”, and this should open a form. The first thing on the form is a chance for you to select one of the available rooms. Then you will be allowed to select the start date and time, and also the end date/time.

     

  4. Once you save these new settings, you will be taken back to the calendar view. Now
    the work is not done because you have the date, but you don’t have the resource name and the person who reserved the room

     

  5. Go to view and create a custom view. The custom view should be a standard calendar, and you will select two items that should be displayed in the month, week, and day context. Two pieces of information that you will select is the name of the resource, then the “created by” columns.

     

In summary, anyone who has access to this calendar should be able to see the person who scheduled a room, the name of the room, and the time that person schedule the room for. Being able to add or remove from the list of available rooms is done by creating another list to store the list of rooms. The column for displaying available rooms will simply pull the data for that column from your new list.

 

**About the Author: Anthony Odole is a Senior Solution
Architect with IBM Global Services. He is a SharePoint Subject Matter
Expert. You can reach him at Odolea@gmail.com

 

 

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Understanding SharePoint Content Types – Concept

Posted by Anthony Odole on September 5, 2008

 

In SharePoint 2007, Microsoft introduced a new concept called Content type. With Content type, you can re-use settings that apply to a type of content. For example, your client requires you to create a library to store four types of expense reports. These reports are not different from what a typical medium Organization uses to track expenses. The following are the type of reports they use: employee expense, departmental weekly expense, company monthly expense, and a quarterly expense reports. On looking at each type of expense report, you realize each report is different from others; they are different because they have different number and types of columns. Of course, you can create one library for each expense report type, but that will be far less than optimal. While you were thinking of creating four libraries, the client also need to store policies and procedures for three departments; the policies and procedures also have five types with different number and types of columns. Not only is creating one library per type is not the optimal solution, but it is a recipe for an unmanageable proliferation of document libraries.

Let’s take the expense report requirement as an example. After you carefully reviewed all the expense reports provided by your client, below is a list of metadata you found associated with each report type:

  • Employee weekly report:
    • Columns – Employee Name, Type of expense, Client Name, Account Number
  • Department weekly expense report:
    • Columns – Department Name, Department Manager, Month
  • Company Quarterly expense report:
    • Columns – Department Name, Quarter.

 

At a high level, these are expense reports, but they are four different types of expense report. If you look closely, you cannot use one document library because each type has different number and types of columns. The good news is that you can store all these, despite the differences in the number and types of columns, in a single document library. To address this requirement, you will create one document library, and then create three Content types. After you create a content type, you need to define the columns just like you define additional column when you create a document library. For each content type, you will add the columns for that type of report, i.e., a one-to-one mapping of each type of report and the content type. After creating one content type for each type of expense report, you will go into your library settings to associate the three content types you’ve created to the document library.

After attaching the three content types to your library go to your library and click on New, and you will have three options:

  • New Employee weekly report
  • New Department Weekly report
  • New Company Quarterly report

When an employee submits an expense report, you want a workflow to route the expense report to a manager. On the other hand, the weekly expense report does not need to be routed. From an object-oriented perspective, content types are equivalent to classes, and each item created from that content type is an object.

Other than reducing the number of document libraries that you need, below some of the advantages of using content types:

  • Content type allows you to store different types of documents that should be grouped based on their user or security requirements.
  • Content type provides a single point of administration because changes to each type of content need to be made only in one place.
  • Content types, like OOP, supports inheritance. You can define a parent content type, and then create new content types that will inherit and extend the properties of the parent.
  • Content type allows you to re-use metadata, template file, workflows, and policies.

 

For a content type that you define at a site level, you can enable any document library within the site collections, and that content type will become available when you try to create a new item in that library. In a future article, I will show, with screenshots, an example of how to use content type to solve a common client requirement scenario.

 

** About the Author: Anthony Odole is a Senior Solution Architect with IBM Global Services. He is a SharePoint Subject Matter Expert. You can reach him at Odolea@gmail.com

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Understanding Access to SSP and related configurations

Posted by Anthony Odole on August 19, 2008

Granting access to SSP remains very confusing to most SharePoint admin and developers alike. Based on the questions I’ve seen asked on most SharePoint newsgroup, SSP remains, other than Business Data Catalogue, an area that is confusing not only to administrators, but also developers. This is a very brief write up to help anyone trying to understand some of the configuration options in SSP.

Be aware that unlike in SharePoint 2003, MOSS 2007 does not give server administrators full control of web applications. To grant full control over web application, you must explicitly grant this permission. To do this, follow the steps below:

  1. Go to SharePoint Central Administration
  2. Go to Application Management tab
  3. Go to Application Security
  4. Go to Policy for Web Application
  5. Add users
  6. Specify individual user or a group
  7. Grant full control
  8. Then click finish.

Now, the user or group you added has full control of the web application.

Even though you have granted this full control, you will notice that the user still is unable to manage audiences, profiles, permissions, or usage analytics. To grant permission for this specific area, you need to follow the steps below:

  1. Log into SSP Administration Site.
  2. Go to Site Actions, then site settings
  3. Go to Users and Permissions
  4. Click on Advanced permissions
  5. Add individual Users or group
  6. This will allow users to login to the SSP administration site

At this point, the user or group will be able to login to SSP, manage Excel Service and search settings. To give the user or group more permission for personalization, you need to

  1. Go to User Profiles and My Sites
  2. Go to Personalization services permissions.
  3. Add Users/Groups
  4. Select which permissions you would like to grant.
  5. Click Save.

In MOSS Enterprise, you need explicitly grant access to Business Data Catalog. This is in addition to the steps above.

Below is a quick overview of what each permission allow a user to do

  • Create personal site: This give a user the user the capability to create My Site. The link to my site appears by default on the main page because of this permission. this is granted to all authenticated users by default. If you go to manage permission screen and remove all authenticated users, MySite will be removed.
  • Manage permissions: This enable user to change personalization permissions
  • Manage user profiles: This enable user to manage User profiles and properties, Profile services policies, and My Site Settings.
  • Use personal features: This enable users to use all the My Links functionality; users can also manage colleagues on their homepage.
  • Manage usage analytics this enable a user to modify usage reporting. Note that you can open the page using he available link but you will get a forbidden error if you try to save your changes. I usually call this a bug.
  • Manage audiences: This enables a user to click on the Audiences link on SSP page, where user can set schedule or define rules for building global audiences.

** About the Author: Anthony Odole is a Senior Solution Architect with IBM Global Services. He is a SharePoint Subject Matter Expert. You can reach him at Odolea@gmail.com

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Why Blog?

Posted by Anthony Odole on August 1, 2008

Now that I’ve worked on so many projects deploying and developing on the SharePoint Platform, it is time  share what I know and what I’ve learnt; time to highlight the strengths and weaknesses of SharePoint Platform. In the hand of a developer who understands the intricacies and complexities of this product, SharePoint is a very powerful tool to rapidly deploy cutting edge solutions — like we have never seen in a very long time. Having said that,  understanding sharepoint is another issue entirely. One project after the other,  there are days when you wonder why the product is not working as expected, why one access or permission issue is giving you such a headache, or  worse still, why is one or the other custom list not functioning as expected; Well, it alls boils down to one thing — the more you become comfortable with SharePoint, the more you appreciate this next generation tool as a complete paradigm shift of how applications will be developed in the future. In this blog, I will be discuss very serious topics, provide quick insights, and address how I solve an issue or error — only if it gives me more than five minutes of headache. In addition to documenting these issues so that I can reuse these in the future, I hope will help on their project.

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Issues – Unable to Create or Edit a Content Source Schedule?

Posted by Anthony Odole on July 20, 2008

If after you install SharePoint 2007 you are unable to edit or create content source schedule, your WSS_WPG group does not have correct permissions to the %windir%\Tasks folder on the server designated for indexing service on your MOSS farm. This is the directory where Windows Scheduler stores scheduled tasks.

Following the steps below will resolve this issue:

1.    Use an account that has administrative permissions to log on to the computer that is running the Office SharePoint Server 2007 indexing service.

2.    Click Start, click Run, type cmd, and then click OK.

3.    Type the following command at the prompt, then press Enter attrib –s %windir%\tasks Note: %windir% is the path of the Windows folder.

4.     In Windows Explorer, right-click the Tasks folder, and then click Properties.

5.    In the Tasks Properties dialog box, click the Security tab, and then click Add

6.    In the Select Users, Computers, or Groups dialog box, type WSS_WPG in the Enter object names to select box, and then click OK.

7.    Grant the following permissions for the WSS_WPG account, and then click OK:

  • Read
  • Write

8.    Reset IIS by typing IISRESET at the command prompt.

9.    Type attrib +s %windir%\tasks at the command prompt

Following the steps above will eliminate the Access Denied error message, and you should be able to edit or create a content source schedule. We had this issue on one of our MOSS implementations. Although the first thought is that something complex is not working properly with our installation, but the solution is as simple as following the steps above

** About the Author: Anthony Odole is a Senior Solution Architect with IBM Global Services. He is a SharePoint Subject Matter Expert. You can reach him at Odolea@gmail.com


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